Jezebel, Jezebel: Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are

peter-forster-ouVAsbiwzlo-unsplash“Olly olly oxen free, Jezebel and Leviathan.” The game is over. We know who you are and what you do. You are the thieves that “come only to steal and kill and destroy…” (John 10:10) relationships, personal identities, and livelihoods. We are calling you out and banishing you to join the other unholy spirits in your hometown of hell.

You may be saying, “Wow, what’s that all about?” As I work with individuals and couples, there at times when I see the spirits of Jezebel and Leviathan working feverishly to create fear and wreak havoc in marriages. Jezebel, Leviathan, or both as partners manifest in people’s worldviews, choices, and behaviors in similar ways. Jezebel is the control freak and manipulator. Leviathan is the great relationship divider—creating separation from God and others and rejoicing in conflict and contention. Together they show up as the narcissist.

robert-nyman--ysyCHixMHU-unsplashDo you have a feeling or inkling that these spirits may have any influence in your life today? If so, don’t feel ashamed, embarrassed, guilty, or even beat yourself up. These spirits are invited into a child’s life at an early age based on your parents’ behavior. When a child doesn’t feel loved, lives in fear, has his/her heart broken, and lacks a sense of security or protection, the anger and bitterness open a portal for the spirits to enter and take up residence in the child’s mind.

Were you physically, emotionally, or verbally abused in childhood? If so, you could be suffering from the influence or torment of a spirit. Unfortunately, adults who’ve been living with the Jezebel/Leviathan spirit may not be able to discern the spirits, because the spirits have a stronghold on their mind. Evidence of the spirits will be in the lack of “fruit” in a person’s life. Do you have difficulty reading the Bible without falling asleep? What is the condition of your marriage and relationships with children and colleagues. Would your friends truly be there in times of need, or do you call them “friends” because of what you can take from each other?

Jezebel is the number reason for divorce. This spirit will cause a spouse to be selfish, controlling, and abdicate any responsibility. The blame will always reside with the other spouse. Does this sound familiar?

freestocks-yB2TGLr-rVo-unsplashAre you tired of failed relationships, torment, misery, anxiety, and conflict? If you believe you’ve got a spirit influence, the only way to rid yourself of them is to forgive and repent. You and Jesus hold the power to bind and caste out the devil.

You must pray a prayer to free yourself from the spirits. You can learn more by visiting www.restoredtofreedom.com. If you’re interested in repairing or improving your marriage with sound Biblical counseling and marriage tools, get the help you need by reaching out for virtual sessions at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or 281.793.3741.

Reference

Schuman, N.L. (2018). Restored to Freedom: The Road to Deliverance from the Enemy’s Finest.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership and ministry. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches individuals, teams, and businesses. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

Your Core Values: Expressed through the Eyes of Jesus

matt-botsford-bBNabN9R_ac-unsplashI have two questions for you? The second we’ll get to later. The first is: what are your core values? How would you describe them in action in your life?

With a foot in the secular life coaching world and another in the ministry of Jesus, I hold some unique perspectives. The more I work with people, we invariably touch upon their core values and how these values shape their feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. If you’d ask me what my top five core values are, I’d have to say service, leadership, authenticity, love, and obedience.

You might say, “Sounds like a good list,” and you’d leave it at that. Afterall, these are my core values. You’re likely more interested in exploring your core values. I say, “Do it,” and encourage you to describe what your core values look like through the worldview of Jesus. My second question: how did Jesus embody your core values as he lived his short life on earth?

You are uniquely made by God, and He instilled a unique combination of core values that are rooted deep inside you. Think of an apple with its core full of seeds. The skin and flesh of the apple is you, and the seeds at the center are your core values. Your life sprouts and grows out of your core values.

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I can see the beauty and appreciate my core values even more, when I see how Jesus lived them out as described through the Bible.

  • Service: Jesus was the ultimate servant by healing the sick, feeding the masses, and bringing the dead to life. During the last supper and their protests, Jesus washed the feet of his disciples, even Judas, whom He knew would betray him.
  • Leadership: The only litmus test of a leader is whether he has followers. The Bible is full of stories where the crowds flocked to Jesus, yet ultimately his leadership is revealed in his ability to convince a small tribe, his 12 disciples, to give up their lives to follow him and become fishers of men.
  • Authenticity: Jesus was the poster child who exemplified authenticity. How many times did he unabashedly tell stories and speak truth that countered the prevailing thoughts of the Jewish culture and Pharisee leaders? He always spoke truth regardless of its repercussions or how it fit in with conventional culture.
  • Love: Jesus embodied love with encouragement, discipline, and teaching. He knew everyone’s heart and still accepted them. Jesus had the longest recorded one-on-one conversation recorded by the Gospel writers with the Samaritan woman at the well. Who was she? The lowest ethnic and gender class shunned by her community for immoral sexual behavior. Jesus loves when others don’t or won’t.
  • Obedience: Jesus embodied obedience when he knowingly sacrificed himself on the cross for humanity’s sin and for our salvation. That was the ultimate act of obedience to God’s plan. Amen!

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What is your favorite Scripture that embodies your core values? Here are mine:

  • Service: John 15:12: This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.
  • Leadership: 1 Peter 5:3: Not domineering over those in your charge but being example to the flock.
  • Authenticity: Ephesians 4:15: Instead, speaking the truth in love, we will grow to become in every respect the mature body of him who is the head, that is, Christ.
  • Love: Galatians 5:14: For the whole law is fulfilled in the statement: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”
  • Obedience: 1 John 2:6: And this is love: that we walk in obedience to his commands. As you have heard from the beginning, his command is that you walk in love.

My prayer is that you’ll spend time identifying your top core values and thinking how Jesus embodied them. Through this self-reflection, you’ll hopefully realize how much you and Jesus have in common.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership and ministry. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches individuals, teams, and businesses. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

Revelation: Which Church Do You Attend?

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Months into living with COVID, many Christians are reading Revelation. Are we headed into End Times? Will we be the generations that live through the final book of the Bible? As I read Revelation and specifically the letters that were written to the seven churches, I couldn’t help but ask myself: what church am I attending and which church best reflects my current faith journey.

The seven letters provide both commendations and rebukes for each church and encouragement for action.

Churches

Is there a church today that is Philadelphia? If so, I don’t think I’ve come across it. I’ve attended or been a member of churches such as Ephesus, which did the hard work but missed the big picture—a personal relationship with Jesus. They were the Martha when they should have been the Mary (Luke 10:38 – 42).

Many churches are proud of their good works but compromise God’s Word. I’ve also been to churches such as Sardis who were effective but superficial. Since authenticity is one of my core values, these churches cause me the most pain. When you truly reflect on your home church, where does it lay on the continuum of superficiality?

martin-sattler-yw2UcAJ6OAU-unsplashIn this day, I see many churches that follow the pattern of Thyatria. In living out faith, love, and service, they also adopt a heavy dose of acceptance for all things liberal in the world. They have sacrificed absolute truth and adopted the mindset that we should be inclusive of everyone’s truth. Christians are not called to judge others, but they are empowered to discern God’s truth and live according to his Word. God offers absolute truth.

My desire is to become Thyatira for its commendation with no rebuke for immorality. Where are you on the continuum? What type of church do you belong or attend? Based on the church and world conditions is there a trend toward the small home church?.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a marriage coach along with her husband, Darin, who help couples across the world via seminars, workshops, and private sessions. She customizes a relationship journey tailored based on curriculums from their own content, Prepare & Enrich, SYMBIS, FOCCUS, and Marriage on the Rock. Couples design their marriage, learn tools, and then work toward achieving their vision. Learn more about the ministry or sign up for a session by contacting Sandra at shinecrossings@gmail.com

What Color Was Jesus?

blackjesus_smallDo you know the shortest verse in the Bible? “Jesus wept” (John 11:35). I imagine that Jesus is now shaking his head back and forth from his throne in heaven, watching the world come under one world order with the gnashing of teeth, destruction, rampant fear, and anger. Countries are merging into global communities through the events spilled forth from the COVID-19 epidemic and the death of George Floyd. Unfortunately, the behaviors of too many people have been less than virtuous: rioting, looting, destruction of property, name-calling, and even what some label as justified murder of police and bystanders.

When I posted on social media that rioting polarizes people and protesting starts the conversation, an acquaintance replied that years of black oppression warranted a few days of cathartic outrage. I guess that quite simply captures what we are feeling and seeing by many in our cities and propagated in our media.

The country has moved from the acceptance of vandalism and desecration of our historical monuments to now encouraging the destruction of all white images of Jesus, because they supposedly represent the works of white supremacy. God helps us! I want to scream, “Stop the insanity! This is ridiculous.”

Scripture states, “So God created man in His own image; in the image of God He created them; male and female.” (Genesis 1:27). Jesus also said, “I and the Father are one” (John 10:30). Jesus, the son of God, represents the image of God on earth for all men and women. What does this mean for us mere mortals? What does Jesus look like in appearance? He’s the image that we carry of Him in our hearts and minds. We are free to create in imagery what we believe Jesus looks like, and not surprisingly, I would bet that each person paints Jesus’ color near their own skin likeness.

I’ve traveled the world and seen Jesus portrayed in paintings, postcards, and places of worship in every shade of skin color. Am I offended by any of these portraits? Absolutely not. I’m just grateful that Jesus has a presence in that community and that people have found a personal savior in Jesus Christ.

So, what color was Jesus? Jesus was all colors. If you’re in favor of ripping white Jesus from the walls, don’t be fooled into thinking you are taring down white supremacy. Jesus was all colors to all men, including white men. Jesus was the lover of the lepers, the healer of the cripples, friends of the criminals, and champions of the outcast. When you defile white Jesus, you are dishonoring what Jesus stands for: love, kindness, compassion, humility, and justice. When you desecrate Jesus in any color, your behaviors ultimately reflect religious bigotry.

For Christians who carry Jesus in their hearts, I believe it hurts us deeply to see our personal savior desecrated, defiled, and pulled off the cross. I can only imagine that we’re getting a small taste of what Jesus experienced during his many hours of crucifixion. Imagine the pain he experienced as he took on the burdens, sufferings, and sins of mankind. He suffered deeply, and we, as Christians, are now suffering. What shall we do with this pain?


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a marriage coach along with her husband, Darin, who help couples across the world via seminars, workshops, and private sessions. She customizes a relationship journey tailored based on curriculum from their own content, Prepare & Enrich, SYMBIS, FOCCUS, and Marriage on the Rock. Couples design their marriage, learn tools, and then work toward achieving their vision. Learn more about the ministry or sign up for a session by contacting Sandra at shinecrossings@gmail.com

Why a Daughter Needs a Dad

limor-zellermayer-qHYC8ajXLB0-unsplashToday is Father’s Day: the perfect time to reflect on why a daughter needs a dad. I didn’t have a dad in my life from 6 to 12 years of age. My stepdad came onto the family scene when I was 13 and played the role of dad during my teenage years. As a single man with no children of his own, he did the best he could as a father figure. I’m grateful for the love and kindness she showed my brother and me through our formative years.

Sons and daughters need and learn different things from each biological parent. A daughter needs a dad to …

  • give her hugs and kisses
  • provide a safe home
  • help her to learn from her mistakes
  • teach her to believe that she deserves to be treated well
  • teach her to make wise decisions
  • tell her truthfully that is she is beautiful inside and out
  • protect her from the boogie man
  • be a soft place to land
  • make her feel that she is unconditionally loved
  • teach her the standard by which she should judge men
  • teach her values and the importance of family
  • be one of her heroes
  • protect her when she’s not wise enough yet to protect herself
  • help her take risks so she can build self-confidence while not saving her from the consequences of her own decisions
  • teach her the difference between selfish and selfless
  • prepare her for hardships of life [no one gets a struggle-free life]
  • create a positive legacy for her family and the generations to come
  • show her that a man’s strength is in the kindness of his heart and not the anger in his voice
  • give her gentle pushes to help her grow
  • provide guidance when she has to resolve her own troubles
  • teach her the joy of serving others
  • calm her when she is stressed by her challenges
  • teach her how things work and show her how to fix things for herself
  • teach her to experiment and challenge her own assumptions
  • tell her what she needs to know about boys and how to recognize a gentleman
  • stand with her on her wedding day
  • model a good husband and father

If you’re a daughter, which handful of needs do you cherish the most in a dad? Would you add any to the list? As I look back on my life, the three needs I wanted fulfilled were:

  • teach her the standard by which she should judge men
  • a soft place to land
  • be one of her heroes

One of my favorite sayings: “No one gets a struggle-free life.” Although I didn’t have the ideal daddy-daughter relationship, I hope that any father reading this will pause, reflect, and choose to try and fulfill these needs in his daughter’s life. It’s never too late to start.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a marriage coach along with her husband, Darin, who help couples across the world via seminars, workshops, and private sessions. She customizes a relationship journey tailored based on curriculums from their own content, Prepare & Enrich, SYMBIS, FOCCUS, and Marriage on the Rock. Couples design their marriage, learn tools, and then work toward achieving their vision. Learn more about the ministry or sign up for a session by contacting Sandra at shinecrossings@gmail.com

 

Money Quotes to Live By

pepi-stojanovski-MJSFNZ8BAXw-unsplashWhat’s your favorite quote on money? That was the question asked in a Q&A while leading my Affording Your Lifestyle workshop for the Prison Entrepreneurship Program. There’s hundreds of quotes to take to heart or take to the bank. I share my favorite in every financial workshop: “If you can’t live on $30,000 a year, you won’t be able to live on $300,000.” If you won’t live on a balanced budget when you don’t have two nickels to rub together, you’ll never have the discipline to live within your means and create long-term wealth.

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Each of the quotes below are worth a read and some reflection. How does each quote resonate with you? What feelings do they evoke? Which ones might you apply more of in you life? Solid financial stewardship provides the foundation for building a life plan. It’s important to evaluate your money mindset, worldview, and the role money plays in your life. Is your relationship with money working for you and helping you achieve your dreams?

My Favorite Money Quotes

Money Mindset

  • “Too many people spend money they earned…to buy things they don’t want…to impress people that they don’t like.” [Will Rogers]
  • “If you live for having it all what you have is never enough.” [Mike Ditka]
  • “Don’t let the fear of losing be greater than the excitement of winning.” [Robert Kiyosaki]
  • “A big part of financial freedom is having your heart and mind free from worry about the what-ifs of life.” [Suze Orman]

Money Principles

  • “Never spend your money before you have it.” [Thomas Jefferson]
  • “Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.” [Ayn Rand]
  • “Time is more value than money. You can get more money, but you cannot get more time.” [Jim Rohn]
  • “You must gain control over your money or the lack of it will forever control you.” [Dave Ramsey]
  • “The only way you’ll take control of your financial future is to dig deep inside yourself and fix the root problem that got you into your financial mess.” [Sandra Dillon]

Money Purpose

  • “Wealth is not about having a lot of money; it’s about having a lot of options.” [Chris Rock]
  • “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” [Winston Churchill]

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“Money is not the currency that measures success” is a worldview counter to today’s message. I care about money in terms of its influence to achieve my servant leadership goals. If you have a favorite financial quote or a money message that’s had a major impact on your life, I’d love to hear from you.

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About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership, finances, and business consulting. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs, and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

 

How Does Your Relationship with Money Affect Your Life?

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When I ask clients to describe their relationship with money, most times I get a confused look. They’re not sure how to respond to that question, because they haven’t given much thought to money along those lines. Eventually, some may say that money is a means of getting what they want, a necessity to buy the basics of life, or the definition of success and power. How would you respond to that question?

Too many people spend money they earned..to buy things they don’t want..to impress people that they don’t like.  [Will Rogers]

We all have a money mindset that translates into a money relationship. Does your money burn a hole in your pocket? Do you put your savings under your mattress? These behaviors all reflect the relationship you have with your money, and if you want to be in charge of your life, you first need to understand your deep-seated relationship with money today. If you are not intentional with your money, your money will be in charge of you.

An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. [Benjamin Franklin]

One of the first steps you can do is take a relationship survey with money to identify the role that money plays in your life—your money mindset. Does having money validate you, does it provide a sense of security? Do you use money as means of measuring your self-worth? Or, is it a means to create new experiences?

Your ability to live out your life purpose will be influence by your money mindset. Are they compatible? The health and satisfaction of marriages are heavily influence by each spouse’s relationship with money. Differences can produce intense conflict, if left unresolved, can lead to divorce.  If you’d like to explore your relationship with money and/or how it affects your marriage or partnership, let’s have a conversation.

It’s good to have money and the things that money can buy, but it’s good, too, to check up once in a while and make sure that you haven’t lost the things that money can’t buy. [George Lorimer]


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership and marriage coaching. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at shinecrossings@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossingsministry.com

 

Conflict: How to Move from Anger to Love

christian-fregnan-W5Vf2fiDvss-unsplashHow many times has someone said or done something that you chose to respond in anger, whether you held back or expressed your emotions? Did you notice how I phrased it as a choice? Most people blame other people for what they feel such as “He made me mad when he said or did…” When you choose to exercise a 100% responsibility mindset, you’ll realize that you own your feelings and your choices.

How does one own their negative feelings and move into a place of peace and safety? The path starts with anger and moves through hurt, fear, remorse, forgiveness, appreciation, and finally ends in love. People commonly get stuck in the fear stage, because it requires personal awareness, humility, and at times uncomfortable decision-making to make it all the way to love. They are required to process their feelings (anger, hurt, and fear) and then move into what can feel like difficult choices (forgiveness, appreciation, and love).

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Example: From Anger to Love

Moving toward remorse requires you to claim responsibility for what you created, contributed, promoted, or allowed to happen. You may not feel practiced or skills, but you can start now. Let’s take an example of how this process might work.

ANGER: My mother makes me angry. Every time I talk with her, she tells me all the things I should be doing with my life and how I’m not making good decisions. She doesn’t realize it, but we’re talking less and less, because she doesn’t have anything positive to say.

HURT: I’m hurt that my mother doesn’t have enough faith in me to make good decisions. I wouldn’t say that all my decisions are the best, but compared to others, I’m holding my ground, and I’m willing to live with their consequences.

FEAR: I’m afraid if I say anything to my mom about the way she is hurting me, I’ll hurt her feelings, she’ll get defensive, or worse yet, it will damage our relationship. I also don’t want her thinking I’m a failure.

REMORSE: I regret not saying anything to her about how I feel. I’m not honoring our relationship by not being respectfully truthful and allowing the distance to grow in our relationship. I own that, and it’s gone on for too long.

FORGIVENESS: I forgive my mother. I know she worries about me, she loves me, and she has the best intentions. Unfortunately, she doesn’t understand what her comments are doing to our relationship, because I haven’t shared my feelings with her. How could I blame her for something she didn’t know?

APPRECIATION: I appreciate my mom. Some people have mothers who don’t even care. I’m lucky to have a mother who cares enough to share what’s on her heart.

LOVE: I love my mom for all that she does for me. Because I love her, I’m going to share my feelings, give examples so she understands what I’m referring to, and then put in appropriate boundaries for our conversations so we can have a positive relationship.

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About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

Saving Your Marriage: There’s No Quick Fix but You Can Fix It

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A married couple sits on opposite ends of our big comfy couch with an emotional chasm between them. I ask, “Tell me why you’re here today?” The wife responds first, “I begged him to come to marriage coaching months ago, and he said we didn’t need anyone’s help. We could figure it out for ourselves. Now we’re both threatening divorce and coming here is our last-ditch effort to see whether we can make our marriage work for the kids’ sake.” The husband follows, “I realize now we should’ve come sooner but can you still help us?”

Our short answer: “Yes, we can help. But I don’t know whether you’re committed to do the hard work and get to the better side.” This usually gets a quizzical look, as if they’re unsure of the answer themselves. They probably don’t know and neither do we, because they’ve never had to work so hard at a relationship to turn it into what they’d dreamed of in the first place. Oxytocin and Serotonin fooled them into thinking they could live off the love chemicals for the length of their marriage.

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Next, we share the following ground rules to see whether the couple is willing to play and win.

  1. Understand there is no magic pill—no one and done
  2. Recognize there is no overnight success—it took years to get your marriage in this condition and it will take time to make it better
  3. Appreciate that if you’re not deeply committed to your marriage, it won’t succeed
  4. Be self-introspective and vulnerable about how you show up and impact your marriage
  5. Live out a marriage mindset that you’re 100% responsible for success of your marriage

If the couple can truly get comfortable with these marriage coaching rules, they have a good chance of pulling their marriage out of the abyss.

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Most couples sign up for marriage coaching, believing they are ready to do the hard work. A few tap out early and either choose to stay in miserable marriages or file for divorce. For spouses who decide it’s too much work, I share: “You’ll have to do the hard work sooner or later if you want any happy marriage. If you walk away now, you’ll likely be in the same position with another spouse down the road. Would you like to do it now or wait until later?”


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a marriage coach along with her husband, Darin, who help couples across the world via seminars, workshops, and private sessions. She customizes a relationship journey for her clients based on their experience and curriculum from Prepare & Enrich, SYMBIS, FOCCUS, and Marriage on the Rock. Couples design their marriage, learn tools, and then work toward achieving their vision. Learn more about the ministry or sign up for a session by contacting Sandra at shinecrossings@gmail.com

Marriage Success: More About Skills Than Feelings

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When Love May Not Be Enough


A young couple sits on our coach, excitedly telling us of their wedding plans: the venue, the guest list, food, and where they are going on their honeymoon. Although their conversation focuses on the wedding ceremony, we’re happy that they decided to invest in their marriage by signing up for our premarital coaching. I ask, “Why are you getting married?” They look at each other as if it’s a trick question. Then they turn toward us and in union respond, “Because we love each other.” By the tone of their voice, it’s obvious they are punctuating their answer with a question mark.

Marriage Statistics

If nearly all premarital couples say they are getting married because they love each other, and if nearly 50% of first marriages and 70% of second marriages end in divorce, you might comfortably conclude that “love” is not enough to sustain a healthy, long-term marriage. Why is love not enough? Perhaps, whether they are aware of it or not, the way these couples are referring to “being in love” is actually a physical response of “feeling in love” that is wholly driven by the chemicals Oxytocin and Serotonin. Unfortunately, studies show these intense chemicals diminish over 6 to 24 months and cannot sustain themselves during a long-term relationship or marriage.

Love Chemicals

When the “love” chemicals dissipate, couples who rate their marriages as fulfilling and happy have tools in their toolkit which allow them to communicate and solve problems that are a normal part of two people becoming one. Countless couples argue and never resolve or manage their conflict, and their marital issues continually recycle and present themselves in different ways. Spouses who rate their marriages as strong and satisfying have effectively dealt with their differences and sores.

What is love? It’s more than a feeling and rooted in knowing a person on a deep human level in conjunction with accepting who they are. Accepting doesn’t necessarily mean liking everything about them. No one can genuinely love someone they don’t truly know. I feel my husband’s love, because I am completely vulnerable in showing him who I am. He knows me as well as myself and chooses to accept my good, bad, and ugly.

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Marriage Strengthening

Marriages need strengthening now more than ever. Societal forces are conspiring even more to undermine couples and marriage. The rate of marriages is declining in favor of increasing rates of cohabitation. Few would argue against equal rights, opportunities, and pay for women, but this shift is changing women’s attitudes toward men. As women grow in independence, they view men as less essential. Now more than ever, we need to fight for marriage and protect its legacy for the couples and their families.

Where does a couple start? Whether you are in a serious relationship, premarital, or married, find a highly recommended marriage coach who can meet you where you stand, help you define your marriage vision, and then take you on a journey that includes communication and conflict resolution skills, budgeting, marriage needs and relationship expectations. Find one who will help you self-explore to understand how you show up to your significant other based on your worldviews and values. Get the support you need to have a fabulous marriage!


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a marriage coach along with her husband, Darin. She helps couples across the world via seminars, workshops, and private sessions. Sandra customizes a relationship journey for her clients based on her expertise and curriculum content from Prepare & Enrich, SYMBIS, FOCCUS, and Marriage on the Rock. Couples design their marriage, learn tools, and then work toward achieving their vision. Learn more about the ministry or sign up for a session by contacting Sandra at shinecrossings@gmail.com