What Color Was Jesus?

blackjesus_smallDo you know the shortest verse in the Bible? “Jesus wept” (John 11:35). I imagine that Jesus is now shaking his head back and forth from his throne in heaven, watching the world come under one world order with the gnashing of teeth, destruction, rampant fear, and anger. Countries are merging into global communities through the events spilled forth from the COVID-19 epidemic and the death of George Floyd. Unfortunately, the behaviors of too many people have been less than virtuous: rioting, looting, destruction of property, name-calling, and even what some label as justified murder of police and bystanders.

When I posted on social media that rioting polarizes people and protesting starts the conversation, an acquaintance replied that years of black oppression warranted a few days of cathartic outrage. I guess that quite simply captures what we are feeling and seeing by many in our cities and propagated in our media.

The country has moved from the acceptance of vandalism and desecration of our historical monuments to now encouraging the destruction of all white images of Jesus, because they supposedly represent the works of white supremacy. God helps us! I want to scream, “Stop the insanity! This is ridiculous.”

Scripture states, “So God created man in His own image; in the image of God He created them; male and female.” (Genesis 1:27). Jesus also said, “I and the Father are one” (John 10:30). Jesus, the son of God, represents the image of God on earth for all men and women. What does this mean for us mere mortals? What does Jesus look like in appearance? He’s the image that we carry of Him in our hearts and minds. We are free to create in imagery what we believe Jesus looks like, and not surprisingly, I would bet that each person paints Jesus’ color near their own skin likeness.

I’ve traveled the world and seen Jesus portrayed in paintings, postcards, and places of worship in every shade of skin color. Am I offended by any of these portraits? Absolutely not. I’m just grateful that Jesus has a presence in that community and that people have found a personal savior in Jesus Christ.

So, what color was Jesus? Jesus was all colors. If you’re in favor of ripping white Jesus from the walls, don’t be fooled into thinking you are taring down white supremacy. Jesus was all colors to all men, including white men. Jesus was the lover of the lepers, the healer of the cripples, friends of the criminals, and champions of the outcast. When you defile white Jesus, you are dishonoring what Jesus stands for: love, kindness, compassion, humility, and justice. When you desecrate Jesus in any color, your behaviors ultimately reflect religious bigotry.

For Christians who carry Jesus in their hearts, I believe it hurts us deeply to see our personal savior desecrated, defiled, and pulled off the cross. I can only imagine that we’re getting a small taste of what Jesus experienced during his many hours of crucifixion. Imagine the pain he experienced as he took on the burdens, sufferings, and sins of mankind. He suffered deeply, and we, as Christians, are now suffering. What shall we do with this pain?


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a marriage coach along with her husband, Darin, who help couples across the world via seminars, workshops, and private sessions. She customizes a relationship journey tailored based on curriculum from their own content, Prepare & Enrich, SYMBIS, FOCCUS, and Marriage on the Rock. Couples design their marriage, learn tools, and then work toward achieving their vision. Learn more about the ministry or sign up for a session by contacting Sandra at shinecrossings@gmail.com

Why a Daughter Needs a Dad

limor-zellermayer-qHYC8ajXLB0-unsplashToday is Father’s Day: the perfect time to reflect on why a daughter needs a dad. I didn’t have a dad in my life from 6 to 12 years of age. My stepdad came onto the family scene when I was 13 and played the role of dad during my teenage years. As a single man with no children of his own, he did the best he could as a father figure. I’m grateful for the love and kindness she showed my brother and me through our formative years.

Sons and daughters need and learn different things from each biological parent. A daughter needs a dad to …

  • give her hugs and kisses
  • provide a safe home
  • help her to learn from her mistakes
  • teach her to believe that she deserves to be treated well
  • teach her to make wise decisions
  • tell her truthfully that is she is beautiful inside and out
  • protect her from the boogie man
  • be a soft place to land
  • make her feel that she is unconditionally loved
  • teach her the standard by which she should judge men
  • teach her values and the importance of family
  • be one of her heroes
  • protect her when she’s not wise enough yet to protect herself
  • help her take risks so she can build self-confidence while not saving her from the consequences of her own decisions
  • teach her the difference between selfish and selfless
  • prepare her for hardships of life [no one gets a struggle-free life]
  • create a positive legacy for her family and the generations to come
  • show her that a man’s strength is in the kindness of his heart and not the anger in his voice
  • give her gentle pushes to help her grow
  • provide guidance when she has to resolve her own troubles
  • teach her the joy of serving others
  • calm her when she is stressed by her challenges
  • teach her how things work and show her how to fix things for herself
  • teach her to experiment and challenge her own assumptions
  • tell her what she needs to know about boys and how to recognize a gentleman
  • stand with her on her wedding day
  • model a good husband and father

If you’re a daughter, which handful of needs do you cherish the most in a dad? Would you add any to the list? As I look back on my life, the three needs I wanted fulfilled were:

  • teach her the standard by which she should judge men
  • a soft place to land
  • be one of her heroes

One of my favorite sayings: “No one gets a struggle-free life.” Although I didn’t have the ideal daddy-daughter relationship, I hope that any father reading this will pause, reflect, and choose to try and fulfill these needs in his daughter’s life. It’s never too late to start.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a marriage coach along with her husband, Darin, who help couples across the world via seminars, workshops, and private sessions. She customizes a relationship journey tailored based on curriculums from their own content, Prepare & Enrich, SYMBIS, FOCCUS, and Marriage on the Rock. Couples design their marriage, learn tools, and then work toward achieving their vision. Learn more about the ministry or sign up for a session by contacting Sandra at shinecrossings@gmail.com

 

Money Quotes to Live By

pepi-stojanovski-MJSFNZ8BAXw-unsplashWhat’s your favorite quote on money? That was the question asked in a Q&A while leading my Affording Your Lifestyle workshop for the Prison Entrepreneurship Program. There’s hundreds of quotes to take to heart or take to the bank. I share my favorite in every financial workshop: “If you can’t live on $30,000 a year, you won’t be able to live on $300,000.” If you won’t live on a balanced budget when you don’t have two nickels to rub together, you’ll never have the discipline to live within your means and create long-term wealth.

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Each of the quotes below are worth a read and some reflection. How does each quote resonate with you? What feelings do they evoke? Which ones might you apply more of in you life? Solid financial stewardship provides the foundation for building a life plan. It’s important to evaluate your money mindset, worldview, and the role money plays in your life. Is your relationship with money working for you and helping you achieve your dreams?

My Favorite Money Quotes

Money Mindset

  • “Too many people spend money they earned…to buy things they don’t want…to impress people that they don’t like.” [Will Rogers]
  • “If you live for having it all what you have is never enough.” [Mike Ditka]
  • “Don’t let the fear of losing be greater than the excitement of winning.” [Robert Kiyosaki]
  • “A big part of financial freedom is having your heart and mind free from worry about the what-ifs of life.” [Suze Orman]

Money Principles

  • “Never spend your money before you have it.” [Thomas Jefferson]
  • “Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.” [Ayn Rand]
  • “Time is more value than money. You can get more money, but you cannot get more time.” [Jim Rohn]
  • “You must gain control over your money or the lack of it will forever control you.” [Dave Ramsey]
  • “The only way you’ll take control of your financial future is to dig deep inside yourself and fix the root problem that got you into your financial mess.” [Sandra Dillon]

Money Purpose

  • “Wealth is not about having a lot of money; it’s about having a lot of options.” [Chris Rock]
  • “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” [Winston Churchill]

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“Money is not the currency that measures success” is a worldview counter to today’s message. I care about money in terms of its influence to achieve my servant leadership goals. If you have a favorite financial quote or a money message that’s had a major impact on your life, I’d love to hear from you.

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About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership, finances, and business consulting. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs, and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

 

How Does Your Relationship with Money Affect Your Life?

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When I ask clients to describe their relationship with money, most times I get a confused look. They’re not sure how to respond to that question, because they haven’t given much thought to money along those lines. Eventually, some may say that money is a means of getting what they want, a necessity to buy the basics of life, or the definition of success and power. How would you respond to that question?

Too many people spend money they earned..to buy things they don’t want..to impress people that they don’t like.  [Will Rogers]

We all have a money mindset that translates into a money relationship. Does your money burn a hole in your pocket? Do you put your savings under your mattress? These behaviors all reflect the relationship you have with your money, and if you want to be in charge of your life, you first need to understand your deep-seated relationship with money today. If you are not intentional with your money, your money will be in charge of you.

An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. [Benjamin Franklin]

One of the first steps you can do is take a relationship survey with money to identify the role that money plays in your life—your money mindset. Does having money validate you, does it provide a sense of security? Do you use money as means of measuring your self-worth? Or, is it a means to create new experiences?

Your ability to live out your life purpose will be influence by your money mindset. Are they compatible? The health and satisfaction of marriages are heavily influence by each spouse’s relationship with money. Differences can produce intense conflict, if left unresolved, can lead to divorce.  If you’d like to explore your relationship with money and/or how it affects your marriage or partnership, let’s have a conversation.

It’s good to have money and the things that money can buy, but it’s good, too, to check up once in a while and make sure that you haven’t lost the things that money can’t buy. [George Lorimer]


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership and marriage coaching. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at shinecrossings@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossingsministry.com